Arielle audiences are upset about logic flaws in the remake – but there’s a good explanation

Arielle audiences are upset about logic flaws in the remake

As a Disney live-action remake, the re-adaptation of Little Mermaid is taking her fantasy characters to a more “real” level. As a live-action film, Arielle has to ask herself a few logical questions, and one of them is currently particularly preoccupying viewers: Why is Scuttle able to talk and breathe underwater as a bird?

Ariel bug? The audience is currently discussing birds under water

In an early scene of Ariel, the eponymous mermaid swims upwards. Banned from surfacing by her father, she meets her feathered friend Scuttle just below the surface of the water, where they chat about dingling hoppers (aka forks). What bothers some viewers is the question of what the bird is doing under water for so long. The original finds the said Conversation with the seagull namely (more logically for a bird) on a rock in the air.

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The best part of the new movie Little Mermaid is the opening scene where the filmmakers apparently forgot that Scuttle is not a fish. And so they show the bird talking and breathing underwater for minutes.

Now Arielle fans argue the pros and cons of this scene and whether Scuttle’s underwater stay realistic is. At least one explanation makes the problem much less serious.

Ariel explanation: Scuttle is no longer a seagull, but a gannet

When comparing the characters from the Ariel remake with the original, it is noticeable that the design of the Seagull Scuttle has changed. Not only is the white bird now a female: the new scuttle is one completely different bird species: a gannet (English: Gannet).

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The peculiarity of these birds is that they shock diver are. In other words: you can Dive deep into the water and stay there longer than other birds, deflating their air sacs. With their broad webbed feet and streamlined wings, they can navigate underwater. Which is actually why the seagull became the gannet in the Ariel remake: so the character could appear in more underwater scenes.

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Ariel’s friend: Scuttle

However, not everyone who blames Arielle for this “logic error” is persuaded by it. They think they see Scuttle breathing underwater and that realistically the bird shouldn’t be able to talk there. But according to this line of argument, one would probably also have to accuse Fabius of producing sounds at all (because fish are otherwise dumb) and Arielle that mermaids don’t exist at all?

With all the serious to joking discussion of such details, we should not forget that Arielle is also available as a live-action adaptation a Fantasy and family film remains. And that’s where talking animals and magic come in.

Ariel the Little Mermaid: Is Disney’s Remake a Success?

In the new edition of the FILMSTARTS podcast on the screen, moderator Sebastian talks to his guests Annemarie and Björn about the new film adaptation of Arielle, the mermaid. They not only discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the remake, but also indulge in nostalgic memories of the Disney classic Рbecause it means a lot to Sebastian, as he tells his two colleagues, who are audibly moved by the story.

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The screen love is the weekly cinema and film podcast of our colleagues from FILMSTARTS

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